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Dedicated to patient care, we utilise the latest arthroscopic and minimally invasive techniques for the management of all hip, knee and shoulder conditions; thereby facilitating the best recovery and outcome for patients from surgery.
Dedicated to patient care, we utilise the latest arthroscopic and minimally invasive techniques for the management of all hip, knee and shoulder conditions; thereby facilitating the best recovery and outcome for patients from surgery.

  • Shoulder Pain
  • Anterior Hip Replacement
  • ACL Reconstruction
  • Rotator Cuff Tear
  • Hip Arthroscopy

Hip

Conditions

Click below links to read about other Hip related conditions

 

Muscle Strain

Muscle Strain A tear in the muscle fibres caused by either a fall or direct blow to the muscle, overstretching and overuse injury is called a strain. Muscle strains often occur in the hip region whenever a muscle contracts all of a sudden from its stretched position. It can be mild, moderate or severe and depends on the level of injury. The chances of having a hip muscle strain becomes high if you have had a previous injury in the area or if there is no warm-up before exercising. The most common symptom of hip strain is pain and swelling in the area of injury. Pain may worsen on using the injured muscle and the strength in the muscle may also decrease. Apart from physical examination of your hip and leg, your doctor may order an X-ray to rule out a stress fracture of the hip and confirm the diagnosis.

Hip Bursitis

Hip Bursitis

Hip bursitis is a painful condition caused by the inflammation of a bursa in the hip. Bursae are fluid-filled sacs present in joints between bone and soft tissue to reduce friction, and provide cushioning during movement.

The bony prominence of the hip is called greater trochanter and is present on the outer side of the upper thighbone or femur. The bursa overlying it is called trochanteric bursa. Another bursa is located towards the groin region and is called iliopsoas bursa. Bursitis of the trochanteric bursa is more common than that of iliopsoas bursa.

Hip Avascular Necrosis

Hip Avascular Necrosis

Avascular necrosis, also known as AVN and osteonecrosis, is a disease caused by inadequate blood supply to a bone, leading to bone death. This disease is most common in adults aged 30-60, but can also occur in children, mainly from cancer therapy. It can affect one or more bones and if left untreated, can lead to the destruction of the adjacent bones, tissues and joints.

Hip Fracture

Hip Fracture

The hip joint is a ball and socket joint. The ball is the head of the femur or thigh bone, and the socket is the cup-shaped acetabulum. The joint surface is covered by a smooth articular surface that allows pain-free movement in the joint. Hip fracture is a break that occurs near the hip in the upper part of the femur or thighbone. The thighbone has two bony processes on the upper part – the greater and lesser trochanters. The lesser trochanter projects from the base of the femoral neck on the back of the thighbone. Hip fractures can occur either due to a break in the femoral neck, in the area between the greater and lesser trochanter or below the lesser trochanter.

Hip Dislocation

Hip Dislocation The hip joint is a ball and socket joint. The “ball” is the head of the femur, or thigh bone, and the “socket” is the cup shaped acetabulum. The joint is surrounded by muscles, ligaments, and tendons that support and hold the bones of the joint in place. Hip dislocation occurs when the head of the femur moves out of the socket. The femoral head can dislocate either backward (posterior dislocation) or forward (anterior dislocation). Hip dislocation can be caused by injuries from motor vehicle accidents or severe falls. The common symptoms of hip dislocation include pain, inability to move your legs and numbness along the foot or ankle. A dislocation may also be associated with a fracture in the hip, back or knee bones. When you present to the clinic with these symptoms, your doctor performs a thorough physical examination and may order imaging studies such as X-rays to confirm the diagnosis.

Gluteus Medius Tear

Gluteus Medius Tear
Gluteus medius is one of 3 muscles in the buttocks and is situated on the outer surface of the hip. The function of the gluteus medius is to assist with pelvis stability, hip abduction, along with internal and external rotation of the hip. Tears of the gluteus medius usually occur where the tendon inserts at the greater trochanter, causing lateral hip pain.

Tears of the gluteus medius can occur due to traumatic injury or degenerative conditions such as tendinopathy (chronic inflammation of the gluteus medius tendon). Gluteus medius tears cause pain and weakness on the affected side of the hip.

Click below links to read about other Hip related conditions

 

Hip Knee Shoulder FAORTHA FRACSInternational Society for Hip Arthroscopy

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