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Dedicated to patient care, we utilise the latest arthroscopic and minimally invasive techniques for the management of all hip, knee and shoulder conditions; thereby facilitating the best recovery and outcome for patients from surgery.
Dedicated to patient care, we utilise the latest arthroscopic and minimally invasive techniques for the management of all hip, knee and shoulder conditions; thereby facilitating the best recovery and outcome for patients from surgery.

  • Shoulder Pain
  • Anterior Hip Replacement
  • ACL Reconstruction
  • Rotator Cuff Tear
  • Hip Arthroscopy

Shoulder

Click below links to know other Shoulder related conditions

 

Distal Biceps Rupture

Distal Biceps Rupture

The biceps muscle is located in front of your upper arm. It helps in bending your elbow as well as in rotational movements of your forearm. It also helps to maintain the stability of the shoulder joint. The biceps muscle has two tendons, one of which attaches it to the bone in the shoulder and the other attaches at the elbow. The biceps tendon at the elbow is called the distal biceps tendon. If there is a tear in this tendon, you will be unable to move your arm from the palm-down to palm-up position. Once the distal biceps tendon is torn, it cannot regrow back on the bone and heal by itself. Permanent weakness during rotatory movements of the forearm may occur if the tendon is not repaired surgically.

Biceps tendon tear can be complete or partial. In partial biceps tendon tear, the tendon does not break up completely. Complete tendon tears will break the tendon into two parts. Tears of the distal biceps tendon are usually complete tears and the muscle gets separated from the bone.

Shoulder Trauma

Shoulder Trauma

Shoulder injuries most commonly occur in athletes participating in sports such as swimming, tennis, pitching and weightlifting. The injuries are caused due to the overuse or repetitive motion of the arms.

Shoulder injuries cause pain, stiffness, restricted movements, difficulty in performing routine activities and popping sensation.

Some of the common shoulder injuries include sprains and strains, dislocations, tendinitis, bursitis, rotator cuff injury, fractures and arthritis.

Clavicle Fracture

Clavicle Fracture

The clavicle is a bone that connects your sternum or breastbone to your shoulder. Clavicle fracture, also called broken collarbone, is a very common sports injury seen in people who are involved in contact sports such as football and martial arts, as well as impact sports such as motor racing.

A broken collarbone normally occurs after a fall onto the shoulder or a motor vehicle accident. The most common sports associated with clavicle fractures include football, hockey and skiing.

Fracture of the Shoulder Blade (Scapula)

Fractures of the Shoulder Blade

The scapula (shoulder blade) is a flat, triangular bone that provides attachment to the muscles of the back, neck, chest and arm. The scapula has a body, neck and spine portion.

Scapular fractures are uncommon, but do occur, requiring a large amount of force to fracture. They are usually the result of intense trauma, such as a high-speed motor vehicle accident or a fall from a height onto one’s back. They can also occur from a fall on an outstretched arm if the humeral head impacts on the glenoid cavity.

Most scapular fractures are not significantly displaced due to the strong supporting soft tissue structures surrounding it. Therefore, a majority of scapular fractures are treated conservatively and with early motion to reduce the risk of stiffness, and will usually heal without affecting the shoulder movement.

Broken Arm

Broken Arm

The forearm is made up of 2 bones namely the radius and ulna. The primary function of your forearm is rotation i.e., the ability to turn your palms up and down. The fracture of the forearm affects the ability to rotate your arm, as well as bend and straighten the wrist and elbow. The breaking of the radius or ulna in the middle of the bone requires a strong force and is most commonly seen in adults. In most of the cases, both bones are broken during a forearm fracture.

The forearm bones can break in several ways. The bones can crack slightly or break into many pieces. Forearm fractures are generally due to automobile accidents, direct blow on the forearm or fall on an outstretched arm during sports, climbing stairs, etc.

Forearm Fractures in Children

Forearm Fractures in Children

The radius (bone on the thumb side) and ulna (bone on the little-finger side) are the two bones of the forearm. Forearm fractures can occur near the wrist or elbow, or in the middle of the forearm. Apart from this, the bones in children are prone to a unique injury known as a growth plate fracture. The growth plate, which is made of cartilage (flexible tissue) is present at the ends of the bones in children and helps in the determination of the length and shape of the mature bone.

The healing of the fractures in children is faster than that in adults. Thus, if a fracture is suspected in a child, it is necessary to seek immediate medical attention for proper alignment of the bones.

Click below links to know other Shoulder related conditions

 

Hip Knee Shoulder FAORTHA FRACSInternational Society for Hip Arthroscopy

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